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Old 09-20-2020, 11:49 PM   #26
BeaverMeat
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Originally Posted by asilomar244 View Post
It loses steering and pushes as it reaches the limit. Throttle on with LSD rear end help to compensate but not enough to overcome it.
What’s the spring rate of those TMEs? From what I understand many aftermarket “lowering springs” don’t really add any more rate. It’s just shorter and make the car lower.

By the sounds of it your rear has more grip than the front... or, the rear just has too much grip (yes, there is such a thing). Are your rear tires larger than your fronts, or have to widened your rear track? It may not “look” the best but, having a narrower rear track is beneficial for helping the car rotate.

One of the reasons you see staggered wheels sizes on high performance road cars is to add understeer... or as I like to call it “lawyer steer”. A good example of this is the 350z. By all intents and purposes it's one of the last old-school overbuilt performance machines made. But, it suffers from lawyers and the "fast and furious" crowed. All you have to do with this car is use a square wheel and tire set-up along with reducing the rear track by 3-5mm you will have yourself a road course eating monster!

Last edited by BeaverMeat; 09-21-2020 at 12:11 AM..
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Old 09-21-2020, 12:17 AM   #27
asilomar244
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Yup that is what I was thinking, the spring rate up front isn't enough and adjustable camber plates would help as well. Really want to get fully adjustable setup with front coilovers at least but that will have to wait awhile.
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Old 09-21-2020, 10:58 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BeaverMeat View Post
What’s the spring rate of those TMEs? From what I understand many aftermarket “lowering springs” don’t really add any more rate. It’s just shorter and make the car lower.

By the sounds of it your rear has more grip than the front... or, the rear just has too much grip (yes, there is such a thing). Are your rear tires larger than your fronts, or have to widened your rear track? It may not “look” the best but, having a narrower rear track is beneficial for helping the car rotate.

One of the reasons you see staggered wheels sizes on high performance road cars is to add understeer... or as I like to call it “lawyer steer”. A good example of this is the 350z. By all intents and purposes it's one of the last old-school overbuilt performance machines made. But, it suffers from lawyers and the "fast and furious" crowed. All you have to do with this car is use a square wheel and tire set-up along with reducing the rear track by 3-5mm you will have yourself a road course eating monster!
This is a very minute effect unless you are in a go-kart.
The wide rear of a 350z is mostly visual.
Fat front bar and no rear bar is the most common way manufacturers try to keep people from backing into trees at high speed.
Here is a good read that gets it sorted out by the end.
https://grassrootsmotorsports.com/fo.../137606/page1/

TL;DR, widening the rear contact patch doesn't transfer as much weight to the outside tire, (sometimes) creating more rear lateral grip. Wider rear on a solid axle affects vert wheel rate regarding a bump (softer), does NOT affect the roll rate of either IRS or solid axle.
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Old 09-21-2020, 11:51 AM   #29
asilomar244
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Originally Posted by BeaverMeat View Post
By the sounds of it your rear has more grip than the front... or, the rear just has too much grip (yes, there is such a thing). Are your rear tires larger than your fronts, or have to widened your rear track? It may not “look” the best but, having a narrower rear track is beneficial for helping the car rotate.
Wheel spacer front and rear with 17" Mimas wheels, 7" tire width I believe? But same tires and track width front and rear.
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Old 09-23-2020, 12:56 AM   #30
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After some thought and calculation I'm thinking about going with ~300 front, ~200 rear, to ~350 front, 250 rear ,springs depending on what dampeners I go with. To be honest I am enticed by the Konis for the adjustability in the front. Bilsteins or something similar in the rear.

Still undecided which rear spring rate... I'm thinking the best Idea is for more to find a good rear set-up and stick with it. Leave the front adjustable with Konis and coilovers,

Last edited by BeaverMeat; 09-23-2020 at 12:37 PM..
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